US market 3.6 Cabriolets that were converted from LHD to RHD

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    • #11183
      Laurence Jones
      Keymaster

      This is a thread that I’ve split from another discussion Topic

    • #11043
      Alan Tew
      Participant

      Mine was built 24/11/1983 but not registered until 1986, and was subject to a factory conversion from LHD to RHD, which was due to lack of sales of this model in the US.

      • #11047

        Hi Alan Yours is the Ex Alan Kelly– The LHD 3.6 Cabriolets never left UK they just loitered around Jaguar Cars until they decided what to do with them.

        Photo 1182

    • #11051
      Alan Tew
      Participant

      It is now a different colour but has the obvious tell tale sign of a conversion, such as the door mirror control blanking plate on the near side door and US style direction indicators.

      Photo 1057

    • #11156
      Alex Finlay
      Participant

      Did something happen that caused Jaguar to abandon the plan to send the cars to the US?

      • #11159

        Yes Alex The US did not want them, like me they wanted the V12.

    • #11164
      Alan Tew
      Participant

      The cabriolet was a compromise as Jaguar thought the US legislation would toughen up on full convertables.  This did not happen so without this doubt I feel sure the cabriolet model would not exist, as the Americans prefer a full open top car together with the V12 option.

      • #11167

        Well  2005 were built &  1,949 V12 Cabriolets made it to the USA and 422 to Canada.

        Here is the distribution list which I have previously posted but you must have missed

        Photo 1185

    • #11170
      Alan Tew
      Participant

      Hi,

      The sales are a result of the unknown legislation.  My view is the convertables would have been introduced earlier, and in my opinion the cabriolet would not exist. I personally prefer my cabriolet  with a solid 3.6 engine that does not overheat, that has a manual gearbox that gives you a better driving experience than the V12 automatic variant. This vehicle gives enough speed and comfort that I need.

      like you I look at the sales of these cars and I am aware of the figures you have produced. For me the situation is perfect and this is my option of the situation.

      • #11212

        You wrote

        I am aware of the figures you have produced. —

        Well I doubt it very much as there is no other list other than this one I created from My Data Base. The figures are not even listed at JDHT.

    • #11194
      Laurence Jones
      Keymaster

      Hi Alan Tew

      I think your view is quite credible – after all the early pre-Jaguar XJ-S Soft Top bodyshop conversions were to create full Convertibles rather than a Targa Topped Cabriolet.

      I’ve both Convertibles and Cabriolets and they are very different experiences, and there might have been merit in having both models if they’d been designed from the ground up at the same time. Then the Sales folk could have directed purchasers towards the most suitable Soft Top for their needs and location – with our UK weather the Cabriolet does work well 🙂 and the full Convertible works well in the southern US.

      I do like driving my V12 Automatic Convertible, but do wonder what a V12 Manual would be like – especially in the Cabriolet. That for me (until proven otherwise by actually driving one) would be the best combination.

      Anyway, just thoughts and opinions shared.

      Laurence

    • #11214
      Alan Tew
      Participant

      Chill out John, your figures are there for members to read and it is good that you have taken the time to break them down to individual countries.  I will try and keep my points in a brief way now so that I do not upset anyone.

    • #11216
      Alan Tew
      Participant

      Hi Laurence,

      i suspect there was not the investment to do 2 models anyway, especially in the crossover from BL to Ford.  I think if they introduced a full convertible in the earlier days it would have boosted sales enormously. As you say the cabriolet does suit our weather as different panels can be easily removed. When travelling to classic car shows I just remove the targa panels only, and then the rest when I get there. My seal for the targa panels is good, but I have placed an order with you for use in the future.  You have to take the opportunity to get one if you hope to own the vehicle long term.

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